Huaraz via Trujillo

After a relaxing time on the beaches of Mancora it was time to head into the Andes. Looking at a map you would figure that this wouldn’t be to complicated of a task but it turns out the Northern access is a horrible road and there wasn’t any direct access via the safer Southern route from Mancora. Most people we talked to said we would have to return to Lima in order to back track to Huaraz. We didn’t liked this answer so after some research we figured we could pull this off by doing a day in Trujillo and switching bus companies for Huaraz. After contacting our Hostel to confirm this was possible and to ask for bus suggestions we were off to Trujillo.

We arrived in Trujillo early in the morning and were able to negotiate a taxi drive (S/ 5) across the city for the bus company that would be taking us to Huaraz, Movil Tours. After booking our tickets for that evening we checked our bags and decided to explore the city. Just down the street from Movil Tours is a neat botanical gardens worth checking out (look for pictures in Mel’s post). After that we were off to see the “Plaza de Armas”.

Plaza de Armas from the mayor's press conference balcony

Plaza de Armas from the mayor's press conference balcony

Melissa in front of the Plaza de Armas

Melissa in front of the Plaza de Armas

Melissa in front of the Cathedral at the Plaza de Armas

Melissa in front of the Cathedral at the Plaza de Armas

We were approached by 2 people in the Plaza de Armas, first a greasy “cheese ball” offering us tours and listing off all the Canadian cities he knew in a attempt to sell us something, and the other was a polite guy from the tourism information bureau. The tourism guy offered for us to visit him in his office and made sure to stick around until “cheese ball” had given up. So we went to visit his office to get some legitimate information. He gave us a handful of maps and told us we could check out the second floor to see where the mayor gave his press conferences. The security guard followed us up which made me nervous at first, but it turned out he just wanted to make sure we saw everything and he even gave us a quick history lesson in English. Done with this building we checked our maps and decided to go to “Museo de Zoologia” which I was sure was a Zoo… turns out it was a Museum of Taxidermy.

reptile on reptile violence...

reptile on reptile violence...

Mike amongst a bunch of stuffed animals

Out of focus Mike amongst a bunch of stuffed birds

The taxidermist liked to give all the animals angry looks, these possums were the creepiest

The taxidermist liked to give all the animals angry looks, these possums were the creepiest

When I originally convinced Melissa to go here I thought it was a Zoo, so I pictured nice big public bathrooms with soap, toilet paper and a toilet seat (in South America a commodity). No such luck, I searched all over this place and couldn’t find a sign anywhere for a Baño. Melissa offered to ask the old guy working in the back and yes there was a bathroom, hidden directly behind the “Seal” display. It was open air and not the most ideal place. As I squatted to do my business I realized Mel and the guy were chatting about his work so  if they could hear me, then they could hear every squirt. I’ll leave out the details.

When I retuned from my “experience” Mel was showing the taxidermist her pictures of the shark jaw she had cleaned earlier this year and he was impressed inviting us back at 4 to show us more of how he does things (or at least that’s how we understood it) So we explored for a while longer returning at 4.

literally stuffed crab

literally stuffed crab

Melissa and her new taxidermist friend

Melissa and her new taxidermist friend, he seemed a lot happier in person

After some shots of homemade wine in a “Inca Kola” bottle with our new friend and a 1/2 roast chicken at local restaurant we were off to bus depot for Huaraz.

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